Understanding ICD 9 and ICD 10 Codes Better

Understanding ICD 9 and ICD 10 Codes Better

Understanding ICD 9 and ICD 10 Codes Better

The first ICD codes were developed by a French physician named Jacques Bertillon. At this time these codes were referred to as Bertillon Classification of Causes of Death. It was in 1893 that these causes of death were adopted in the United States, and have always been considered as ICD 1, simply because this was the very first ever version of code numbers.

Since the time of Jacques Bertillon, medical science has progressed, and with this progression has come the development of new diagnosis. These diagnoses have also been developed, described and named, as well as having the diagnosis list updated. Sometimes, the number designation will change and sometimes the updates are so extensive that major wholesale changes need to be made. There are also annual changes that need to be made, but these are mostly considered as minor changes. During these annual updates, the basic code set does not change. An example that could illustrate this is that ICD 6 was the first coding system that included codes for mental disorders, in 1949. This system was upgraded in 1977 to ICD 9 and this again became the first time that procedure codes were to ever be added, and the CM designation included.
 
Most of the diagnosis codes found in the US today are actually ICD 9 codes. With very few exceptions, the paperwork that a patient receives when leaving the doctor̢۪s office will include Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), with the purpose of describing what the doctor has done, with the intention of an easier billing process. There are also ICD 9 CM codes included here that describe why the service was provided. In addition to this, most of the death certificates that are known to have been filed since 1977will tend to have an ICD 9 code on them.

Dell ICD 10 is actually the most current list of codes that is available for use today. There were minor revisions added onto Dell ICD 10 codes with the purpose of making them available for medical use, and made their debut in early 2009, and made available by the NCHS. It has been noted that globally, most of the countries have been quick to adopt the use of ICD 10 codes. One of the reasons as to why the American healthcare system has not been so quick to implement the use of ICD 10 is that the transition can prove to be very expensive, and there are major obstacles that could be faced during this transition.